Spotlight on Sleep-related movement disorders

Movement disorders are classically thought to resolve during sleep. Sleep-related movement disorders, however, are a subset that are characterized by their presence in sleep.

In this article, Dr. Lauren Talman and Dr. Stephanie Bissonnette of Boston Medical Center discuss these sleep-related movement disorders based on the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-3rd Edition (ICSD-3). These disorders include restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleep-related leg cramps, sleep-related bruxism, sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder, benign sleep myoclonus of infancy, propriospinal myoclonus at sleep onset, sleep-related movement disorders due to medical disorders, and sleep-related movement disorders due to medication or other substance.

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Twitter Digest for April 12, 2019

Twitter Digest for April 11, 2019

Spotlight on Meningiomas

Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors. Many meningiomas can be followed clinically and radiographically and may not require therapeutic intervention. Although most are benign, morbidity can be high, and in some cases the tumor is fatal.

In this article, Dr. Karen Dixit of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine reviews the pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of this tumor, including new prognostic indicators in atypical and malignant meningiomas.

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Twitter Digest for April 10, 2019

Twitter Digest for April 9, 2019

Twitter Digest for April 8, 2019

Spotlight on Akathisia

In this article, Dr. Stewart Factor of Emory University School of Medicine discusses akathisia, the abnormal state of motor restlessness; it is most commonly caused by neuroleptic therapy and is sometimes perceived as anxiety. Akathisia can be an acute side effect that improves with withdrawal of medication, or it can be tardive, which occurs after chronic therapy and worsens with drug withdrawal. Literature demonstrates that it occurs with atypical antipsychotics although perhaps less commonly than is seen with typical agents. It can also be caused by antidepressants. The treatment is different for acute and tardive forms. For the acute form withdrawal of the causative agent followed by use of propranolol, mirtazapine and trazodone may be used if necessary. These agents can be helpful for the tardive form, but other drugs for tardive dyskinesia may also be tried.

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Twitter Digest for April 5, 2019

Twitter Digest for April 4, 2019