Spotlight on Sleep-related movement disorders

Movement disorders are classically thought to resolve during sleep. Sleep-related movement disorders, however, are a subset that are characterized by their presence in sleep.

In this article, Dr. Lauren Talman and Dr. Stephanie Bissonnette of Boston Medical Center discuss these sleep-related movement disorders based on the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-3rd Edition (ICSD-3). These disorders include restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, sleep-related leg cramps, sleep-related bruxism, sleep-related rhythmic movement disorder, benign sleep myoclonus of infancy, propriospinal myoclonus at sleep onset, sleep-related movement disorders due to medical disorders, and sleep-related movement disorders due to medication or other substance.

To view the complete article, click here and log in.

Spotlight on Movement disorders associated with autoimmune encephalitis

Movement disorders are prominent in the clinical presentation of many autoimmune disorders. They are common in over 50% of cases in children but less so in adults. Nonetheless, the subacute onset of a new movement disorder in a subject older than 50 years of age should prompt the suspicion of a possible autoimmune disorder.

With this article, Dr. Anelyssa D’Abreu of Rhode Island Hospital/Alpert Medical School of Brown University provides not a comprehensive review of autoimmune encephalitis but, rather, focuses on disorders in which movement disorders are an integral part of disease symptomatology.

To view the complete article, click here and log in.

Spotlight on Posttraumatic movement disorders

The concept of movement disorders following trauma to the central and peripheral nervous systems has been widely accepted. It has both medical and legal implications to clinicians and their patients. Dr. Sith Sathornsumetee, from the Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital at Mahidol University in Thailand, and Dr. Mark Stacy from the Movement Disorders Center at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, review and provide updates on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of posttraumatic movement disorders.

To view the complete clinical summary, click here.

MedLink Neurology authors are always at work to bring you broad and up-to-date coverage of neurology topics. We are pleased to highlight clinical summaries that have been recently added or updated and to introduce the authors who write these authoritative articles. We hope you enjoy these overviews and appreciate the contributions of our more than 450 authors who keep MedLink Neurology the premier information resource for neurologists.

Spotlight on Psychogenic movement disorders

Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenge for the clinical practitioner, as the diagnosis and treatment are usually difficult and the prognosis may be poor in some patients. Sometimes also referred to as “functional,” “conversion,” or “psychogenic,” these disorders must be differentiated from “organic” disorders. New evidence from imaging and neurophysiological studies suggests that these patients may have an increased connectivity between the supplementary motor area and the amygdala but lower functional connectivity with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In this clinical summary, Dr. Baizabal-Carvallo of the Parkinson’s Disease Center and Movement Disorders Clinic at Baylor College of Medicine discusses current advances in the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of psychogenic movement disorders.

To view the complete clinical summary, click here.

MedLink Neurology authors are always at work to bring you broad and up-to-date coverage of neurology topics. We are pleased to highlight clinical summaries that have been recently added or updated and to introduce the authors who write these authoritative articles. We hope you enjoy these overviews and appreciate the contributions of our more than 450 authors who keep MedLink Neurology the premier information resource for neurologists.