Spotlight on Idiopathic hypersomnia

In this article, Dr. Logan Schneider of Stanford University School of Medicine discusses idiopathic hypersomnia, which is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty awakening (sleep drunkenness), and undisturbed overnight sleep without cataplexy or known cause of excessive sleepiness.

Excessive sleepiness (hypersomnolence) of unknown etiology, which cannot be explained by another disorder, would be considered idiopathic hypersomnia. This should be clearly distinguished from other disorders that could present with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness, such as narcolepsy, behaviorally-induced insufficient sleep, circadian rhythm disturbance, obstructive sleep apnea, or from hypersomnolence secondary to a medical condition or medication. These patients frequently present in adolescence and may have symptoms of autonomic nervous system dysregulation, but they are most often affected because of inability to attend to daytime obligations such as school or work. Because the pathophysiology is unknown, management is limited to symptomatic treatment and education.

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Spotlight on Hypersomnolence

Hypersomnolence is deleteriously prevalent, especially in modern society. The common medical complaint has various underpinnings. Sleep medicine, as a growing field or subspecialty, can evaluate the nature of the problem and improve life and longevity with a myriad of scientifically effective interventions. The cost to society, if sleepiness is left unaddressed, is profound given the negative effects on health and on education and on work-related issues, including workableness and propensity toward accidents and clashes.

Hypersomnolence, or excessive daytime sleepiness, is a frequent complaint of patients and a symptom associated with many medical conditions, including intrinsic sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea or insufficient nighttime sleep. Though a nearly universal experience, sleepiness is often ignored or minimized by patients, often increasing their risk for industrial or motor vehicle accidents.

In this article, Dr. Richard Knudsen of University of California Davis Medical Center discusses the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of this often overlooked symptom complex. Information from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (3rd edition) is highlighted. Newer therapeutic agents, deemed somnolytics, are reviewed.

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Spotlight on Hypersomnolence

Hypersomnolence is deleteriously prevalent, especially in modern society. The common medical complaint has various underpinnings. Sleep medicine, as a growing field or subspecialty, can evaluate the nature of the problem and improve life and longevity with a myriad of scientifically effective interventions. The cost to society, if sleepiness is left unaddressed, is profound given the negative effects on health and on education and on work-related issues. Fitness to drive is a challenging dilemma given an aging and senior population.

Hypersomnolence, or excessive daytime sleepiness, is a frequent complaint of patients and a symptom associated with many medical conditions, including intrinsic sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea or insufficient nighttime sleep. Though a nearly universal experience, sleepiness is often ignored or minimized by patients, often increasing their risk for industrial or motor vehicle accidents. In this article, Dr. Richard Knudsen of University of California Davis Medical Center discusses the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of this often overlooked symptom complex. Information from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (3rd edition) is highlighted. Newer therapeutic agents, deemed somnolytics, are reviewed.

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Spotlight on Idiopathic hypersomnia

Idiopathic hypersomnia, often mistaken as narcolepsy, is a common cause of excessive daytime sleepiness. Excessive daytime sleepiness has a significant negative impact on quality of life. Although the exact details are as yet unknown regarding this disorder of central nervous system sleep and wake state controls, it is a fascinating source of investigation to assist in decoding the mystery of how the brain modulates the sleep and wakefulness states. A customized treatment plan with lifestyle changes and stimulant therapy can improve excessive daytime sleepiness. In this clinical summary, Dr. Marcel Hungs, a sleep medicine practitioner in St. Paul, Minnesota, discusses the manifestations, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of idiopathic hypersomnia.

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