Spotlight on Traumatic cranial neuropathy

Traumatic cranial neuropathies are often seen with fractures involving the skull base. They most frequently involve the olfactory and optic nerves at the anterior skull base or the seventh and eighth cranial nerves in the temporal bone. In this updated clinical summary, Dr. Richard Polin of George Washington University adds epidemiological and incidence data on traumatic cranial neuropathy.

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MedLink Neurology authors are always at work to bring you broad and up-to-date coverage of neurology topics. We are pleased to highlight clinical summaries that have been recently added or updated and to introduce the authors who write these authoritative articles. We hope you enjoy these overviews and appreciate the contributions of our more than 450 authors who keep MedLink Neurology the premier information resource for neurologists.

Spotlight on Posttraumatic movement disorders

The concept of movement disorders following trauma to the central and peripheral nervous systems has been widely accepted. It has both medical and legal implications to clinicians and their patients. Dr. Sith Sathornsumetee, from the Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital at Mahidol University in Thailand, and Dr. Mark Stacy from the Movement Disorders Center at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, review and provide updates on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of posttraumatic movement disorders.

To view the complete clinical summary, click here.

MedLink Neurology authors are always at work to bring you broad and up-to-date coverage of neurology topics. We are pleased to highlight clinical summaries that have been recently added or updated and to introduce the authors who write these authoritative articles. We hope you enjoy these overviews and appreciate the contributions of our more than 450 authors who keep MedLink Neurology the premier information resource for neurologists.

Spotlight on Posttraumatic sleep disturbance

In this clinical summary, Dr. Mari Viola-Saltzman discusses posttraumatic sleep disturbance, which affects 30% to 70% of individuals after traumatic brain injury and often occurs after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent complaints after head injury. Narcolepsy (with or without cataplexy), sleep apnea (obstructive and/or central), periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias are less commonly reported after traumatic brain injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common traumatic brain injury comorbidities with substantial influence on sleep quality. Diagnosis of sleep disorder after traumatic brain injury may involve polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy. Treatment is disorder-specific and may include the use of medications, continuous positive airway pressure (or similar device), and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury often does not improve sleepiness or neuropsychological function.

To view the complete clinical summary, click here.

MedLink Neurology authors are always at work to bring you broad and up-to-date coverage of neurology topics. We are pleased to highlight clinical summaries that have been recently added or updated and to introduce the authors who write these authoritative articles. We hope you enjoy these overviews and appreciate the contributions of our more than 450 authors who keep MedLink Neurology the premier information resource for neurologists.